delish_passover

Learn to cook Herbed Spring Lamb, Pomegranate Gastrqiue & More with Gabe Fine

We’ve been a little quiet at Black Trumpet because we’ve been working behind-the-scenes–securing a new prep kitchen for our pop up.

We’re happy to say that we’ve landed at KI in in Brookline, and are pairing up with them to offer cooking classes–both pre-holiday cooking classes and classes that combine text study with experiments in the kitchen. Stay posted on our blog or on twitter to hear more.

We’re kicking off the cooking classes with a pre-Passover class with dishes and flavors chosen to be a taste of the coming spring (come on spring, get here already!) we’ll cook up a meal of herbed spring lamb, pomegranate gastrqiue, and lemon drizzle-roasted asparagus. In this two and a half hour class, you’ll cook an unforgettably delicious meal, learn tips from professional kitchens for better presentation and more efficient prepping, and get into the holiday spirit by sharing a joyful kitchen with others. You’ll walk out of the class with a sample meal to try before the holiday kicks in and recipes (digital and physical) for your collection.

Sunday 3/29, 4:30pm | at the KI Kitchen. [384 Harvard St, Brookline]

KI Member: $55
Non-Member: $65

To RSVP, email kris@congki.org
Call 617/277-9155 with any questions.

photo: Adapted from Mathew Packer

Sichan Salt Savory Flavor

Flavors of Sichuan–Salt Savory Flavor

Salt Savory Flavor is one of Sichuan cuisine’s most subtle tastes—and it highlights a key element of the Sichuan food philosophy: the concept of xian wei. We’ve mentioned xian wei before—it’s that hard to describe, magical taste that is at the essence of fresh meat, poultry, fish, mushrooms, and other ‘xian-rich’ foods. The point of Salt Savory Flavor is to draw out that essence using salt, sometimes supplemented by very small amounts of other flavors such as sugar, soy sauce or sesame oil.

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What are the flavors that make Sichuan food so fracking good? In this series, we explore these flavors, drawing from Fuschia Dunlop’s list of the ’23 flavors of Sichuan food’ which can be combined with prep methods, different food types and shapes to create an almost infinite set of culinary possibilities.

Sichun Scorched Chili Flavor

Scorched Chili Flavor–Flavors of Sichuan

This is the flavor of that famous, delicious dish, Gong Bao chicken (often called Kung Pao chicken here.) Timing is key to this dish–dried chilies are fried very carefully in oil so that they are fragrant but not burned, and then other ingredients are added in. These can include some of the common suspects: sichuan pepper, soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, ginger, scallions and garlic. The flavor of this sauce is one of those combinatorial ones: It combines the key classic flavors in this lil’ glossary we’ve put together with Dunlop’s help below, plus more.
xiang: fragrant
la: hot
han: salty
xian: hard to define—that amazing flavor of fresh meat, poultry, fish
tian: sweet

Yum yum yum. All the good things.

***
What are the flavors that make Sichuan food so fracking good? In this series, we explore these flavors, drawing from Fuschia Dunlop’s list of the ’23 flavors of Sichuan food’ which can be combined with prep methods, different food types and shapes to create an almost infinite set of culinary possibilities.

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